SAP appoints regional director for Southern Africa

SAP appoints regional director for Southern Africa

SAP Africa has announced Cameron Beveridge will be Southern Africa's new regional director.

SAP Africa has appointed Cameron Beveridge as regional director for Southern Africa.

SAP says that Beveridge is a seasoned professional with a 25-year career in technology and had until recently led one of SAP Africa's largest business units, with responsibility for SAP cloud and related solutions.

Cathy Smith, MD at SAP Africa, said Beveridge had earned a reputation as a leader that can inspire the best in his team.

"Cameron's experience, integrity and undeniable passion to harness the incredible talent within the organisation makes for a winning formula for this challenging role. His drive and commitment will be invaluable to our local teams as we support local businesses in their quest to becoming Intelligent Enterprises that can take advantage of the exponential opportunities of this digital age."

Beveridge is an engineer by training and has also worked in outsourcing, consulting and sales. He holds an MBA from Bond University in Australia.

In March 2018 SAP Africa appointed Smith as MD and she became the first female leader of SAP Africa. She took over from Claas Kuehnemann, who took on the role of acting MD for SAP Africa for eight months, but who then moved to a new leadership position with SAP in Switzerland.

SAP in July 2017 announced an executive shake-up and appointed an interim management team for Africa after four management team members were placed on administrative leave pending the outcome of a forensic investigation into allegations related to one of its contracts.

This was after reports surfaced that the German-based software giant paid "kickbacks" for it to access lucrative state contracts.

The executive team who was running SAP Africa before the scandal broke were MD Brett Parker, COO Mehmood Khan, SA MD Lawrence Kandaswami, and CFO Deena Pillay.

SAP has since come clean on the allegations saying it found compliance breaches and "indications of misconduct" in $50 million (R595 million) of public sector deals in South Africa involving the Guptas, friends of former president Jacob Zuma accused of corruption.