Create a cybersecurity culture

Create a cyber
security culture

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Wednesday, Jan 16th

Zambia to fast-track cyber security Bills

Zambia to fast-track cyber security Bills

The Zambia Information and Communication Technology Authority (ZICTA) has appealed to locals to update their operating systems in light of the May WannaCry ransomware attacks that affected networks in over 100 countries.

ZICTA PR officer Hansford Chaaba said the regulator will continue to closely monitor the sector working in collaboration with other government agencies to ensure maximum national security.

"We encourage members of the public to be alert and immediately inform ZICTA if affected by the aforementioned cyber-attack," Chaaba said.

Minister of Communications and Transport Brian Mushimba said the attack justifies the government's urgency to enact the cyber crime and cyber security Bills.

"People are accusing us of coming up with the laws in order to silence our political opponents who are attacking the government through social media. But the recent cyber-attack justifies why we urgently want to put the laws in place and no doubt we will now move faster," Mushimba said.

The minister said the Bills will be taken to parliament for enactment once it resumes next month following a recess.

Not-for-profit communication for development organisation Panos Southern Africa (PSAf) has urged the Zambian government to ensure that the proposed laws do not impede the smooth flow of information.

"We also urge the Zambian government to exercise caution and guard against any gaps that may result in the laws restricting citizens from using ICTs to seek, receive and share information," PSAf said.

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